Tagged: Megan

8th May 2015: Queens Square and the 1970’s.

Queens Square Banner_DSC00135-001

 

Last meeting and we were on an away day in Queens Square where we were joined by the Filton Orphans Scooter Club for a 1970s themed photoshoot. Huge club thanks to Myk Garton for organising this, it was a good evening enjoyed by everyone I talked to and an equally big thank you to the Filton Orphans for providing some magnificent props. Megan Gearing, Kelly Wolf Rogers and Paul Walker were our models.

 

Given the colour of the buildings and the fact that we were shooting into that period of the evening when the light turns more blue, I decided to shoot with the white balance set to shade. This warms the general look of the image (more than cloudy, see below) and I think worked well. I remember having a conversation with a photographer a couple of years ago, before I got into digital myself, and he reckoned that shooting with the white balance set to cloudy was the best setting for his photography. Basically he had his camera permanently set on that because he likes/liked the effect. He is not alone in this. Maybe a little extreme for my taste, all the time, but I can certainly see that there are occasions when it makes a strong case. There is an important thing to take into consideration here, because what we are talking about is the final look of the image and the idea that there is a correct aesthetic for the colour rendition of subjects within an image, when there is in fact only a set of choices. Accurate is quite often a word that is thrown around when talking about rendering an image as an exact a record of an object in the real world. In the camera it becomes a series of electronic artifacts, that represent an object or set of objects in the real world. That is to say there is a certain amount of interpretation involved.

 

With the permanent cloud conversation in mind, I thought that I would use this week’s blog to look at that setting probably most ignored by most photographers because the camera does it for them, in a manner generally acceptable. Ladies and gentlemen I give you the White Balance.

 

Let me set down at the outset that if you are uncertain about what you are doing auto will work in most situations. Sort of. It has got better over the years, that is for sure. Certainly it will work well in sunlight. If you look at the settings on your camera, even most compacts these days, you will find a range of settings other than auto white balance. The settings themselves we will return to later. The reason that these exist is because light changes colour over the course of the day and we talk about it in terms of its temperature, which is measured in degrees Kelvin. The colour of this light will affect the colours in your photographs because what we see are objects reflecting the available light into our eyes which are converted into images in our brains. Cloud cover also plays a role in determining the colour of light at any given moment, lending the light a blue hue. This is before it starts to bounce off objects absorbing different wavelengths. But our brains colour correct and so we see not the colour modified hues and shades but the brain’s algorithms for determining what it should look like. Your camera sensor records according to the temperature of the light it receives reflected from the object(s) you are framing. Please note it is where the objects are and the light it/they is/are in that is important not the light where you are (unless it is the same when it obviously doesn’t matter).

 

Well, again, sort of. White is 18% gray in photography, you may have heard. This is to do with colour neutrality. Some people never leave home without a gray card, certainly they have their uses, but they are not a deal breaker when it comes to taking photographs. You can colour correct in post production (yes even with jpeg but only to a relatively small degree and not in the same way as in raw, as the assumption of what the white balance is is coded into the jpeg file when you press the shutter. With raw its more WYSIWYG – what you see is what you get – and can be manipulated over a wider range of possibilities because all the information is left in).

 

So there are reasons of colour temperature for the settings in the white balance menus on your cameras. AWB – automatic white balance – is a fire and forget mode, just not always accurate. We then move into general categories. Daylight calibrated from the noon day sun, is fairly neutral and the target which the other settings are designed to immitate. Flash is cooler than daylight on tone (has a higher Kelvin temperature). Shade compensates for the blue by warming up the colours (counter-intuitively lowering the colour temperature) so does cloudy, but to a greater extent. The picture of the light bulb denotes a tungsten colour temperature. Almost orange if uncorrected, with a dollop, to use the scientific phrase, of blue. The picture of the flourescent tube tells you that the sensor is going to have the warm tones boosted to overcome that rather cold, sterile light.   Then we get into the custom settings which can be used in conjunction with colour temperature meters and those grey cards we mentioned earlier. They do take getting used to to use properly. If you are interested in getting a light meter and or colour temperature meter and have a smart phone they can easily and freely be downloaded from the Android or Apple stores. They seem to work pretty well (I have Colour Temp meter and it falls into the category of useable. Grass is generally around the 18% grey mark and makes a good substitute as does the palm of your hand which will read about 2/3 rds of stop under exposed as a general rule).

 

As I started out saying at the top of this piece, you can play around and adopt he settings at will. Cloudy and shade have been the two I have used most often (which I would quantify as not very often) to warm up, and it works well with Cotswold stone backgrounds. I have also tried the bluer settings against a sky of pretty uniform grey cloud. It didn’t work out well but there is a germ of an idea there. Whatever you use you will almost certainly have to change the settings when you get the camera out afresh, or you will, with equal amounts of certainty, have some unplanned colour balances when you download to your computer. This is where CSC’s win out. They are WSIWYG – though it doesn’t work if you ignore the evidence of your eyes. A friend told me that, you understand. Wouldn’t do it myself. Of course not. No.

 

For all of that there is, you will be happy to know, one more universal setting that eliminates all this faffing around. It’s called black and white.

 

 

A N N O U N C E M E N T S

NEXT MEETING: Round 4 of the ROC.

 

Check out the Flickr competiton on the club Flickr page. To be found on the discussion page.

26 February 2015 – On The Kingswood Salver and A Walk In The Park

Five images by five club photographers on a connected theme. That’s the general outline for the Kingswood Salver. As a brief it’s pretty wide and that makes it a challenging in more ways than one. Last Thursday marked the start of the 2015 Reflex Kingswood Salver campaign with an evening organised by Roger and Eddie around the theme of collectables. Sunday there was a club shoot at the Blaise Castle estate involving Red Riding Hood, a Huntress (Kelly Wolf Rogers), a Clown, a Knight (Paul Walker), a modern girl (Snehal “Tia” Panchbhai), a Pre-Raphelite (Rachel Pratt) , a Goth (Megan Gearing), two dozen club photographers, one drone, several dogs, random small children and assorted owners of the above wandering in and out of shot as happens in any public space.  A busy week and a very enjoyable one, thank you to Myk,  Steve D, Eddie and Roger for their sterling efforts in organising these two events.

 

A busy club night saw musical instruments, dolls, insects, back-lit fruit (you had to be there, and thanks Kevin), buttons, figurines (mainly of the Dr Who variety) and “Stuff” brought along by club members and photographed. Two things struck me, not unrelated. We had a limited time on the evening, but the primary focus of the event was to get people started and thinking along the lines of the competition rules, so both space and time were at a premium (though I have to say the hall we hire is a very good space for our purposes) and my first thought was that we would not have been able to do as much had we been shooting film. We would have needed more lights – you only get one go at the ISO and that is largely pre determined – we would have had far more white balance problems, we would be up to our ears in filters (80A 80B and 80C filters to cool the light and 81A 81B 81C to warm it up for the uninitiated, where A is the lightest and B the darkest filter in the range and for the nostalgic, scientifically minded or otherwise curious link here for the joys and wonders of JIS B 7125). For all the discussions on the merits of film v digital, digital is far, far simpler (mostly a-good-thing sometimes a not-so-good-thing), more flexible and one hell of a lot cheaper. In this case it enabled more people to take more photographs in a given space and time. The club Facebook and Fun Shoots pages had more than a few contributions because of it. A good start was made.

 

There was a mixture of table top and backdrop photography going on. The lighting question was partially resolved by the club lights, Gerry’s increasing collection of luminous paraphernalia the odd flash gun, reflector and of, course, the built in flash. You don’t need a huge variety of lighting equipment. Those advantages of using digital I spoke of above mean that you can use a variety of light sources. DIY lighting is a viable option for the amateur (and the odd professional I suspect) and LED lighting in particular is getting cheaper and more adaptable. For table top in particular, where you can make your own light tent/box for next to nothing either as a one off or something a little more permanent (beards and cardigans are optional). The other thing you need is a little information on light modifiers and you can easily practice this at home. Using a full backdrop? Then you can make your own softbox for probably even less. This was a well chosen warm up.

 

Sunday was forecast rain from lunch time, turning to heavy rain till mid afternoon. Yes we got rain, but not until the end of the shoot and there was plenty for everybody. A range of models, good and varied light for the most part and an all round positive attitude from everybody made it both fun and instructive. As usual there were plenty of people on hand to help out with technical queries and the models all gave it their best which made for variety. It is also a good opportunity to try out something new. I found that I could have a use for the 10fps motor drive  and experimented with a combination of RAW and the fully programmed setting on the dial. Never used P before (only had the camera for 20 months or so – it has that many settings!), not in too much of  hurry to use it again, but it gave me an idea of how it works in a variety of situations and can see when it might be useful. Still haven’t used the 3D setting – maybe next time.  These outings are both social and educational.  The Blaise Castle Estate (which got an early celebrity endorsement from Jane Austen) has more locations than we used for the day and is a fine public space. The history of it is well worth reading. We used the woodland in the morning and the “Castle” (built as a residence rather than a folly apparently) as a backdrop in the afternoon and the caves on our way out.  The terrace of the main house, and the Dairy House were among the locations we didn’t use.  It is a fine resource that was very nearly lost.

 

Next meeting ….

Speaker – Justin Quinnell – “Aristotle’s Hole” ….. Be there or be square. Though to be fair there is no evidence that the hole was square …… Cue Bernard Cribbins, better yet see link below or checkout the events calendar on the club website  See link below or checkout the events calendar on the club website or check out Justin’s website.

 

And the link is: RCC_notice_5 March 2015

 

A N N O U N C E M E N T S

ROUND 3 Reflex Open Competition Deadline is 5th March. See the above link or the rules on the website for the size and submission requirements.

Apologies for the late post this week, some technical issues with my laptop.