Tagged: Farm

30th August 2018 – Cars Seaside Cars

You can’t help but wonder what American cars, especially the classics, now that the laws of physics and the demands of aerodynamics homogenise nearly all cars, would look like if their roads actually had bends and the distances between towns shorter. But road trip is something big within the American cultural psyche and you may as well do that in style. A short trip down the A38 to Colliters Brook Farm in my rather small Toyota wasn’t quite the same – until I got there.

The club outing was to the bi-weekly American classic car meeting at the aforementioned farm, another one of those things that I hadn’t quite got round to taking the camera to – and I am not alone in my guilt there. So two expeditions in three weeks to photo some classic American metal.

Now, professional photographers specialising in motor vehicles do rather have advantages over the amateur on a club night at a social gathering in terms of access, but essentially we are both taking pictures of metal boxes. True, they are, for the most part, desirable metal boxes, but they are metal boxes nonetheless.

As always there are the two extremes, detail and the whole view, and the best image lies within a combination of those two. Location also makes for impact, but when it’s someone else’s car in a static display details are probably going to take up the bulk of the successful shots taken. And car designers take a lot of time in designing those details in, even if the demands of price sensitive mass production hammer the more exotic and difficult to manufacture ones out.

Being shiny metallic and it being evening the best we could hope for was a cloudy sky, or at least a sky with some cloud in it. A polarising filter certainly helps, but lack of one shouldn’t stop you photographing cars or other shiny surfaces, you just have to be a bit more savvy. The reason behind this is reflections and, to some extent with a low sun, shadows. Again we have got two choices, use them or loose them. Both are fine. In the latter case we have the option of using a polarising filter, which will help a lot but not be a total solution. Making a feature of them gives us more scope, it also means that the photographer ends up in more of his/her shots than s/he wished for, but careful use of angles can mute the impact.

As in the last post on portraiture, street and art there are more telling pictures to be had in the details than in worrying about getting the whole thing/person in frame. Those details, the automotive ones I am talking about here, are deliberate and functional, and collectively go into what the whole picture looks like, even if it is increasingly homogenised by the demands of legislation and aero dynamics. It is the details that tell the story often more effectively in photographic terms.

Those details may be manufactured, but detail can also be the difference in a familiar landscape. The more recent outing to Clevedon for sunset shots of the pier demanded exactly that. There is no doubt that the sun going down over the Severn Estuary with the stone beach as foreground and the long span of the pier leading the eye towards the setting sun is an effective and sound, emotive even, scene just right for capture. But it has been done. Many times and whilst it is good to have our own version of this it can look rather like a copy, even though the skies will never be exactly the same in detail, the angle ever so slightly different.

It is one of those shots that is almost a right of passage for any local, budding, landscape photographer. All areas have have them. But how to get more out of that ever changing scene? Different angles, different foregrounds, different areas of interest can make for quite stunning images, but there are always questions of what respects the landscape and what impact the photographer has upon it, especially when everyone is doing it. The general guide lines for landscapers is you leave it as you found it, don’t go gardening nature and claim it as a part of creation. But this maybe a bit narrow. There are other ways to capture an arresting landscape image without the threat of getting arrested. There is even a use, actually a fair number of uses, for that circular polariser again, though it does not have to be screwed on to the lens taking every landscape photograph.

Landscape doesn’t have to mean travelling hundreds of miles to catch the first or last rays of the sun (also some great twilight pictures to be had for the patient and informed), there is plenty of it here in the West Country you can capture in the Golden hour or the Blue. Or switch to black and white and shoot from dawn till dusk. Middle of the day is a great time for infra red too (full and very technical discussion here). You don’t even have to change loction once you have settled on a composition as there is always something going on in it.

And there is always something going on in Reflex. Thursday 6th September is the start of the new season back at the Wicklea Academy in St Annes. If you are in the area why not pop along to our members summertime review?