Category: Meetings

22nd January 2015 – On Colour Space

Colour space and gamut. Sounds like a poor man’s crime fighting duo, but as Rich Price showed us it is a surprisingly powerful way to subtly (or not so) expand the presentation of colour in an image. Concentrating on derivatives of RGB, Red, Green, Blue, from which all other colours can be made and moving towards white, there are a number of different models – the basic physics of how we end up seeing the rendering – all existing to do the same job: Turn 1’s and 0’s into recognisable colours on screen or in print ( the model is the printer’s map, the image the contour lines). CMYK mixes cyan, magenta, yellow and black (the K stands for Key ), on the page and is popular with magazines and similar publications, and works by subtracting light from white as the start point. Then things start to get complicated with other models, such as CIELAB and CIE XYZ that approximate human vision in constructing colours and are used converting RGB images to CMYK. In itself all fascinating but not something that we need particularly concern ourselves with in depth.  It gets very technical but is interesting.

 

So much for the models but we were concentrating on the work spaces. There are a number of them: sRGB – the most common found in display screens and cameras, PhotoRGB, the aforementioned CIELAB and Adobe RGB are a few. Rich concentrated on sRGB, and Adobe with a  brief excursion through ProPhoto which Adobe use between LightroomTM and PhotoshopTM. Prophoto has a very large gamut, in fact 15% of it cannot be seen with the human eye. More is not always better, as with everything else, more is only useful when you have a need for it. If your image is looking muddy it is far, far more likely that you are viewing the narrower sRGB profile in an image that was modelled in the more defined Adobe RBG than the straight forward “fault” of the more limited spectrum. Most people cannot tell the difference most of the time. The gamut of any two profiles will have colours in common but when comparing sRGB and Adobe RBG the number of shades that can be represented between two points of saturation. What the smaller gamut will produce is an approximation of the colour defined in the larger one and necessarily, it will be different. The basis is in the degree of colour gradation that can be shown, that is the number of steps (shades) you can produce in the transition between two (complimentary) colours on the colour wheel. Just for the record the “small” sRGB colour space has 16,777,216 (256 for each of the RGB channels) colours in it.

 

The most likely time you will see the difference is when you print a digital image. Printer manufacturers have their own profiles and these are usually pretty easy to get hold of – unlike the Linux version of Adobe which seems to have disappeared from their website. These can then be loaded into your editor, the internet will show you how for your programme if you don’t know. Paper manufacturers also have different profiles for their papers and the respective manufacturers web sites are the best places to start with this. What this means is that if you are sending off your treasured image to be printed then you get a heads up on what the final thing will look like through your editing programme. It can change quite a bit, for example, an early morning mist shot I took yesterday, an almost golden light, when reviewed via a Fuji printer ICC profile downloaded from the print shop, showed some of the shadows moving from an almost dark chocolate to cyan – the valley opposite had oxidised! It also saves you time and money when printing at home, and quality inkjet ink is not cheap and cheap inkjet ink can quite often look it, especially on a quality photo paper.

 

Rich, when he started his presentation, stated that there is an important factor to be taken into consideration when we are talking about colour space, which can easily be overlooked and comes to us from the familiar colour wheel. Colour space is three dimensional, whereas the colour wheel as most of us remember it is two dimensional. The three dimensions are hue, saturation and lightness aka HSL aka HSV (v – value) and they form the backbone of all image editing software. What we are doing when we edit is navigating our way around this space, forwards, backwards, side to side and up and down and in a combination of these three. That gives us a clue that there are work flow questions to be answered here. Work flow in itself is a whole separate blog and we will return to that sometime in the future, but essentially it is all the production, administration and physical actions it takes to complete a process. There are many different forms of workflow, probably as many as there are photographers practising, but, when it comes to colour space there are some basics worth heeding – not least the effect your monitor is having on the images you are viewing and the accuracy and compatibility of colours when your image meets other devices. The club has a device for calibrating monitors which is available to borrow to club members. Ask about it at a meeting if you want to know more.

 

The second half of the meeting was a practical and members were busily engaged in the delights of LightroomTM and PhotoshopTM and there were more than a few “Aha!” moments. So, our thanks to Rich for his time and energy in putting this together. Next meeting is our own Adrian Cooke who will be talking us through a selection of his images.

 

Next meeting is also the deadline for Deadline for “Dear Reflex…” questions      “Dear Reflex…” is a question and answer session where club members can ask any photography-related questions of the club. These will later be presented to members who will have the opportunity to volunteer to answer them, and given time to present their answer.

 

See you Thursday!

15th January 2015 – On the Club Battle v BPS and Travel in Uganda

Busy week with the Club battle versus Bristol Photographic Society on Wednesday and an interesting and well explained substitute evening from Adrian Herring ARPS DPAGB and Vanessa Herring LRPS from the Kingswood Club and their month long trip to Uganda standing in for our own Simon Caplin who was ill. Get well soon Simon.

 

BPS first. The camera battle was the third battle of the evening for those who attended. First there was the weather, which was atrocious, then there was the perennial how-do-you-park-in-Clifton Village? followed by the club evening camera battle judged by Sandie Cox ARPS, CPAGB and WCPF Members Exhibition Secretary. May I extend a club thanks to all those involved, to our hosts who were most gracious (and victorious) to Sandie for her detailed feedback and obvious, detailed, preparation and to the committees of both clubs for making it happen. RCC extend our best wishes for their upcoming move to Montpelier, where the premises are more capacious and the access easier (you can even get there on the train!).

The final score was BPS 335 v RCC 285, a wider margin than a year ago when the scores were BPS 366 v RCC 331. The two club sets were varied and natural history (Sandie’s RPS panel subject and one where she has particularly strong feelings, unsurprisingly), travel, street, and art all proved popular categories. Sandie’s other great love is for monochrome which wasn’t widely represented this year and as she said herself, for a particular sort of monochrome.  BPS had 9 images scored at between 18 and 20, RCC 2 and the distribution of marks was between 13 and 20 for BPS and 11 and 18 RCC. Last year it was 15 and 3 respectively in the 18-20  marks and the range was between 16-20 (BPS) and 14-18 (RCC). Overall it was an enjoyable evening to brave the elements on and here’s looking forward to the 2016 battle!

 

Results

Economy Steve Hallam 11
Pandoras Box Barry Mead 18
In Step Derwood Pamphilon 16
Mikie Darren James 15
Common Darter Rich Price 12
Waxwing on Berry Mary Pears 16
1925 Wendy O’Brien 11
Dancer in her Final Pose Julia Simone 17
Forest Giants at Dawn Steve Taylor 14
Vicars Close Mark Stone 14
Red in the Pocket Greg Duncan 13
Puffin and Catch Geoff Morgan 16
Gull Feeding on Flies Mono Lake Val Duncan 17
Red Nose Band Barry Mead 18
British Summer Eddie House 15
Riding High Greg Duncan 18
Knock-out Punch Julia Simone 14
That 80’s Feeling EddieDeponeo 15
Pallas Bat John Hudson 15
Iceland Rich Price 18
Going for the Basket Val Duncan 18
Kingfisher Rich Price 11
Welcome Barry Mead 20
Wish I was out there Geoff Morgan 18
Namib Storm Approaching John Chamberlin 20
Abandoned Mark O’Grady 16
Working Together Greg Duncan 20
Judge Sandie Cox ARPS CPAG 335 285

 

 

So, on to the Herring’s adventures in Uganda. A recent month-long trip to Uganda to see not only the country but also the work of the organisation run by Vanessa’s cousin, Soft Power, and operating in Jinja. Some miles were certainly put in and the huge variety that Uganda encompasses was on show in a vibrant projected and print presentation that filled the evening. Adrian and Vanessa’s skill and experience was obvious and whereas we would all do slightly different things with the same opportunity, something they showed with the occasional different view of the same subject, it is the individual interpretation of the rules of composition, storytelling and angle that make a different story for the viewer and the photographer as we have examined over the evenings, activities and posts of this season.

 

As with Kev and Rich’s presentation on Iceland last season, the key to the Herring’s successful trip was planning and deliberation. In order to make something worthwhile happen they had to be open to what was going on around them, but also needed a direction and purpose. We come across the idea of serendipity again.

 

The Adrian and Vanessa took a couple of telephoto zoom lenses with them amongst their kit and that introduces a fundamental question about what you need to take when you travel, and there appear to be two opposing schools of thought here. The debate about the merits of the Prime Lens v The Zoom Lens is as old as the zoom lens. Weight, size and maximum aperture definitely lie with the fixed lens. Speed in framing, where you would have to physically move or change lenses to better frame the shot and therefore general flexibility lie with the zoom. Prime lenses also tend to be sharper, especially at the wider apertures and cheaper because there are less moving parts and less glass in their construction.

 

Some of the advantages of primes over older zoom lenses, especially the early ones are beginning to be eroded. F5.6 seems to be increasingly a leveller when it comes to sharpness and image stabilisation, where fitted, certainly is found a lot lower in the price range of zoom lenses than primes (for a reason). That means you can be more flexible in the use of your ISO because good results are available with lower shutter speeds than without an IS or VR option (Image Stabilisation is the same as Vibration Reduction). You pays your money and you takes your choice, but one other factor to consider is the type of photography you are going to indulge in. Smaller, lighter, less intrusive will almost certainly win out in street photography, but with faster moving subjects, the ones where the relation to the photographer are constantly changing, especially from foreground to background, the zoom option will give the opportunity of more shots taken. That’s potentially more. No guarantees of quality in quantity. There’s just a bit more to making a keeper.

 

The upshot of these considerations is that you need to plan. The glass you have is the glass you take in most cases, not least because this can be an expensive hobby and laying out on new kit constantly isn’t either affordable nor particularly desirable – for most of us. Get to know the equipment you have well.  Don’t, as I have written about before, itinerate to the minute, so much can be lost by trying to pack too much in. You want to avoid, I suggest, the feeling of being on a touristic production line. The Herrings mentioned several times the uses of local guides and local knowledge, especially if it can help with being navigating around and even avoiding the worst in popular areas (and sometimes not-so-populated) and they plainly took their time in engaging with local people and volunteers on the project they visited and helped with. This pays dividends when you are travelling – and even when you’re not, the same goes for street and environmental, studio, modelling, well you get the idea.

 

So our thanks to the Herrings for an interesting evening. Next meeting Rich is giving a talk on the use of colour space. Here is a little something on gamut and colour space by way of introduction, if that isn’t something familiar to you.

 

Announcements

 

Don’t forget the club Flikr page competition. This month the topic is COLD.

 

Closing Date for next round of the ROC is Thursday 22nd.

 

27th November 2014. On Christmas Cards, Art and Galleries

In the week where the Guardian carries an article on the, probable, opening of the, possibly, world’s largest photo-gallery in Marrakesh, and the unexpected but entirely predictable problems that this has generated (avoidable if someone had bothered to do their homework, or paid someone else to, or maybe it was deliberate) we at Reflex Camera Club stayed a little closer to home and set ourselves up in true Santa-at-the-Mall-in-May spirit for a little Winter Festival commonly known as Christmas (which I understand is in December). Specifically, members were tasked with producing a club Christmas card in an evening. There was, dear reader, some controversy, about which, more later.

 

The original Christmas card, at least as far as the UK (and the world) is concerned, was introduced in 1843 at the cost of 1 shilling (5p to you non duo-decimalists), which was rather pricey at £4.28 in today’s coin (that might make me look like a cheapskate, but then I am). The average retail cost of a card in 2013 was £1.44  (4d in 1843 money) according to the Greetings Card Association (Yes, there is one). The original run of 1,000 cards was followed by another of 1,050 and the ones he didn’t use Henry Cole sold at a profit. He sold them all. Today Christmas is worth £130 million in card sales, according to the GCA.  The original card was also controversial, for its depiction of alcohol, but it was a sell out. One of the 18 or so thought to remain in existence was sold in 2010 for $7,500.  One of our cards (which went to a tie break on a show of hands) was controversial for its more, to use a period allusion, Scrooge-like qualities (which was also alluded to in another entry with the greeting, “Bah Humbug”, I’m beginning to think that the Xmas spirit maybe a little thin this year – we will find out on the 18th December which is our Club Christmas night). In the end we decided on a more traditional offering from Roy Williams (Photography), Myk Garton (Editing) and Alec Williams (Executive Producer).

 

Henry Cole, the man in too much of a hurry to write to all his friends and relatives in the first place, engaged the artist JC Horsley to illustrate his innovation. That, and a DPS article this week, set me to thinking about the relationship between art and photography (writing a blog will do that to you). There does seem to be a tension between the states of “Photographer” and “Artist”. As touched on in last week’s blog, the same rules and guides apply to painters creating an image as photographers. The term “Creative” as a profession is somewhere in the middle of this. Creative, as a description of an economic sector is worth, according to the UK Treasury, £8,000,000 per hour to the UK economy. Artists, the people who create the work, form a substantial part of this but not the only part. There is a further tension between the art itself and the industry around it that makes for its consumption.

 

Yet there is still a cachet around the status of artist – I bet your unmade bed made less at auction than Tracy Emin’s depiction of depression – that is part of the process of selling it, regardless of the message that you were trying to get across. Exclusivity, being the owner of that Van Gogh or that Rubens or anything else creatively produced, is also a driver, not least of market value – but once a photograph is published on line anyone can consume it (as opposed to own. Or steal). Possibly this makes photographers artisans, but in a week where “snobbery” undid three establishment figures (I am thinking Andrew Mitchell, Emily Thornberry, and David Mellor) one needs to be mindful of being “All the gear and no idea”. Maybe, after all, it isn’t anything but a sterile argument, as entertainingly exposed by Richard Thripp (do take some time to read the comments under his post, they do rather prove his point).

 

The number of photography books both about and using it (e.g. fashion) you will find in bookshop certainly underline the point that this is a visual medium that isn’t going to go away. The craft of art is there, but some think that because the process doesn’t involve fine motor-skills with a sharpened stick dipped in something then you’re not an artist. David Hockney is less of an artist for using a camera among his tools? Around about here we mostly get into a Vicky Pollard style argument. What seems to get neglected is the argument “Does it matter if it is/is not art”? Let me pose one half of an answer. No, because, if taken seriously, any artistic endeavour is about making it as best you can and next time better. The tools don’t make the art the artist does. Photography is a representative art. The camera is a tool, the image a story. A canvas, paint and brushes are tools, the image a story. The infamous bed and detritus so many berate Ms. Emin about are the tools for her to tell a (personally painful) story.

 

This brings me back to the news story I started with, the planned gallery in Marrakech. There are enough problems surrounding photography, even in the UK, especially street photography, however, one of the points made in the article is about the behaviour of so many people (tourists) towards the locals and a disregard of the traditions and culture they are snapping away at. Start from a point of respect and you learn a lot more. Both sides in the photography is/isn’t art take note.

Feel free to agree/disagree with me via the comments section on the club blog page.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Reminder:

WOODLAND PHOTOGRAPHY DAY

See Myk or contact him via the club Facebook Page.

 

UPCOMING AT THE CLUB

December 4th – Capturing Stunning B&W images plus Post Production Tips from basics to more advanced from Mr Mark Stone. Kindly take a few minutes to peruse https://www.flickr.com/photos/mark-stone/ and contact Mark via the club Facebook page with one you want to know more about.

December 11th – The second round of this year’s Reflex Open Competition (ROC) will be judged tonight.

December 18th – Christmas social evening. To quote Mark S:

” Thursday 18th December is our Christmas Social. We’re planning on doing an American Supper style evening which means we’d like you to bring some food & drink. So that you don’t all bring in a pack of Scotch Eggs we’ve created a list that will be on the sign in desk each week up until the 18th. If you’d like to take a look at what is on the list just peek at the PDF attached to this post.

It’s no good saying on here what you are planning on bringing you need to sign your name (in legible writing) next to the items on the list at the club meetings”. The List is via the link below. ‘Nuff said.

Christmas food list

Ian G.

Hi, we’ve got a guest blogger for todays post. Our new club Secretary Ruth Doyle.
——–

We are coming to the end of another amazing year in the life of Reflex Camera club. Sadly we have lost a few members but have gladly welcomed many more. I would ask you all to look back on this season and ask 2 questions

  1. What have I got out of the club ?
  2. What have I put into the club ?

 

In an ideal world the answer to 1 would be at least equal in number to the answer to 2 but who lives in an ideal world.??
Only remember that to have made the club as successful as it is SOME members answer to 2 far outweighs their answer to 1 and YOU could hold the balance.

Membership is about ‘BEING A PART OF “and I would like all members to ensure they are a part of the club next season.

How can you do this ????

ATTENDANCE – every £1.00 helps  – PARTICIPATION –  in events and competitions – SHARING – your skills and expertise

The more we all put into the club – the more we can all get out of it .

See you all in our New Venue for another fantastic season.

Ruth Doyle

Secretary

Continue reading

26th June 2014. Photography as a business.

Two articles caught my eye this week, one in the Guardian, one at Digital Photography School, both of which I posted to the Clubs Facebook timeline, both on the same topic – photography as a business. Now, in particular, I don’t claim to know a huge amount about photography as a business, it seems a good way to turn a passion into a millstone very easily, but I do know a fair bit about business in general and have made a decent living out of that knowledge for more years than I really care to count.

 

Alfred P Sloan (an economist) possibly was the man who coined the phrase “The business of business is business” a fine example of the circular argument – one that supports itself by ignoring everything that isn’t itself therefore must be true on its own terms. It’s catchy because it’s hard to argue with.  It does, however, contain an element of truth, as most circular arguments do.  In this case you might be able to make a business out of a hobby but you can’t treat a business as a hobby (unless you have a lot of money to throw away, in which case it’s still a hobby not a business). As Mark S, Mark O, Dan T, Simon C and others have all made the fundamental point that it is the client whose taste, needs and wants prevail. Their cash pays your bills. You get their cash by giving them your interpretation of what they want. The point is, they still have to want it when the cheque clears in your bank. That is the point at which the job, the business of business, is complete. Never, ever, before (says the man who has rebuilt two credit control systems from heaps of paper, believe me only about 2.5% as interesting as it sounds).

 

That said there are probably more opportunities to monetarise your photography than ever before – and more people in on the game. The market is crowded. 150 photographers listed on Yell in Bristol (though some of those may be multiple entries). You need to know your market and you need to know how to keep motivated. One of the first things that people come to realise, especially in service industries like photography, is the amount of time that the business of business takes up. This is one of the big differences that mark out the amateur (and the semi-pro in a lot of instances) from the professional. The amateur can put a lot of planning into a shoot, the professional has to put  a lot of planning into every shoot. Always, always do your own research. Post processing done to a deadline is very different from post processing done at leisure. As Benjamin Franklin put it in Advice to a Young Tradesman, Written by an Old One (July 1748) “Time is money”. If that image is taking you more than ten minutes to process isn’t it a lost shot? If every shot is taking you 10 minutes, and you have 400 of them, have you got 67 hours to spare and run the business? Sleep?

 

And what do you charge? There is as much to that as art as there is science. You have to be pretty well established to get away with fee £x00 (or £x000 even £x0000 depending on your reputation) + production costs and talking to a client with pretty deep pockets. You are probably not a wedding or baby portrait photographer either. The temptation is to get too close to cost just to get the gig. Bad choice, worse habit. And the tax returns and associated paperwork? Billing? Chasing? Sales and Purchase ledgers? Equipment? Is this what you became a photographer for? We haven’t even started on getting new business, the most difficult and most expensive type of business to get (you really want referrals and repeat business). Going into business for yourself is a lot of hard work.

 

But there is no doubt that it can be rewarding. You are your own boss. You get to do some of the things you want to do and if you are smart you use the challenges from the commissions you don’t feel inspired by (but need to take to pay the bills) to spark your creativity, to take new techniques and to work them into the shoot (when appropriate), but keep in sight the fact that the customer is always right. It is not their privilege to pay for you proving that you can’t operate out of your own or your gear’s limits.

 

Most of all you need drive, not just to get up and go on sunny days but on the rainy days too. But if you’ve got an idea then here’s a place to start.

12th June 2014. f8 and be there.

A decent turnout at the Langton Court Hotel for the annual social and awards event. The skittle alley thundered to the sounds of skittles standing resolutely in place. For a camera club there were remarkably few in evidence, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing, less clutter to fall over and I don’t want to think of the consequences of joining consumer electronics with liquid (says he typing this with a cup of tea in one hand).  Next year’s calendar was distributed, and I must say that it looked really interesting, and awards were bestowed thus:

Reflex Camera Club Overall Competition results for 2013 – 2014

 

Novice trophy
1st Place 82 Points John Pike
2nd place 43 Points Pauline Ewins
3rd Place 26 Points Wendy Goodchild
Projected Trophy
1st Place 43 Points Pauline Ewins
2nd place 30 Points Mark O’Grady
3rd Place 26 points Wendy Goodchild

&  Angie Wallace

Print Trophy
1st Place 64 Points John Pike
2nd place 55 Points Mark O’Grady
3rd Place 35 Points Alison Davies
John Hankin Shield

(Best Print of the Year)

Eddie House
Stan Scantlebury Shield

(Best Projected of the Year)

Eddie Deponeo
Photographer of the Year

(Overall Points Winner)

85 Points Mark O’Grady

Thanks Julie for the table.

And the winner of the game of Killer in the Skittle Alley was —– Julie Coombs.

 

We have had a successful year in the number and variety of events, speakers and activities and a big club thank you to everyone who made that possible.  The new website looks excellent and new members are joining. With the move to new premises everything seems set fair.

 

To a point we participate in the club in order to determine what makes a good photograph, so that we can go and take good/better photographs.  Practice based learning. There are as many opinions on the “Good”  as there are photographers. One of the reasons that there are competitions and judges is the idea of some sort of standard around the rules of composition, the exposure triangle and leave room for the imagination of the photographer. This year – and it is not very different year to year, nor I fancy, from club to club – we have had many different examples, from different sources. We have had competitions – the best source for individuals for what is known as reflective practice – speakers and practical evenings.  We have had the benefit of the WCPF travelling show. These have also allowed us to look at wider issues too: planning, doing and reviewing, taking the opportunity, making the opportunity. We have also had the chance to talk about the giving of constructive feedback with one of our speakers and to practice it (and don’t I drone on about it every competition round?).

 

So, what have we learned this year? The point is the picture not the gear, Canon, Leica, Nikon, Pentax, Sigma, Sony anything else, not whether it’s a RAW or a JPEG or a TIFF (note that argument, not so very long ago was about whether it was film or digital, an argument that has just gone away) or any other format that counts. If there isn’t a basic structure to grab the attention then all of the above is irrelevant. It doesn’t matter about what it is you are taking a photograph of , it is how it is represented in the frame, what is included and, frequently as important, excluded that makes it so. Vary the angles, up, down, left, right (it’s not about your comfort it’s about the shot!). Keep the viewers eye engaged in the frame – this is why a vignette sometimes helps by keeping the eye from wandering to the outside of the frame on their way out of the picture. It should tell a story, a good one, with a punch-line. That the lighting is everything.

So, looking forward to next season? “F8 and be there”. See you next week.

 

Proper Prior Planning Prevents Poor Photography Practical

So how was it for you? Does Proper Prior Planning Prevent Poor Photography? Serendipity aside, and it does play a part it just limits what you will be able to take for the reasons discussed last week around the whole incidence and coincidence that is wrapped up in what we call “luck”.  You make your own. A well attended evening, including some prospective members  –  hello I hope you enjoyed the evening and if you have any suggestions for the blog please either contact one of the committee, leave a comment, or use the suggestion box at the door of the club. A little prior research doesn’t  do any harm and Hanneke had us do a little pre- event thinking. This discipline doesn’t just apply to the studio. I am sure that there was a deal of head scratching as well as prior-reconnaissance and some “Oooh I’ll go that way” as well as those more cautious souls who stayed closer to the hall (and of course the tea and biscuits) and Gerry’s still life flowers. The brief was five (or more) different approaches to a subject.

Myself, Dan E. Megg G. and prospective member Jackie headed upstream by Brislington Brook to the pack horse bridge (Nightingale Valley to those who know it), which is less than ten minutes from the School (runs from Maes Knoll to the Avon). Some went to St Anne’s Park, some to St Anne’s Wood, others got more adventurous and took to the roads.  The results were interesting, even people in the same group can take the same subject but the angles, light, height, camera settings, detail selection are all personal and all make for a subtly different image. There were some fine images on display after the break and thanks everyone for sharing, though I am not sure my electricity pylon lived up to it and Jackie did it better. It’s a start. It’s not yet a habit for most, I would hazard a guess and even then it will depend on what sort of habit it becomes.

Let me elaborate. I have taken to portaging a Nikon Coolpix I got for a knockdown price from e-Bay around with me every time I leave the house over the last week or so. Just in case. 20MP for about £45. Bargain. That means, with the phone, I have two cameras I take pretty much everywhere with me.  The just in case bit is telling though. I got it because I missed a street photo that formed in black and white in my mind the second I saw it (OK I had been thinking about getting it for a while, this was the final push-against-an-open-door). I don’t very often do street. Even if I had my DSLR with me I am not sure that it would have got taken because it would have been too intrusive, especially in the available space there was to take it in. The battery on the phone was flat. Either, Serendipity, yes, but Planned Serendipity because I was looking for photo ops at least subconsciously, OR, Planned serendipity, no, because I hadn’t taken the preparation seriously enough – that is taken more care to keep the phone charged. I err towards the latter. That photograph is lost because it was never taken and will never be taken.

The habit is one of preparation. Deliberate preparation with the added stimulus of making more than one representation. Hanneke was not saying don’t pick up the camera bag and go for a wander, she was saying pick up the camera bag (making sure there is a camera in it, of course)  go for a wander because you have created the expectation which sharpens your focus with the intent of making one aspect stand out. A sort of Bokeh for the mind.

 

 

Busy week for announcements.

* If you are reading this then you most likely have seen the letter from Maurice reference the move of school to just up the road. It’s the post before this one. Sounds promising.

 

** Please remember the Flikr competition, this month it’s on the subject of reflections. Voting open for May’s competition too.

 

*** 19th July, the chance to photograph back stage at the Bristol Hippodrome, a outlined by Maurice at the at meeting. The show is the Rat Pack, details from Julie as follows:

If you read the information attached we have the chance to send 6 photographers along for a paparazzi style experience including behind the scenes photos which sounds great. You just have to agree to send a copy of your photos to them afterwards and they retain the copyright – but you can still use them in club competitions which seems very fair.

 

If you are interested in going into the draw for one of the 6 places please send a reply to this reflex e-mail letting me know and I will put your name into the hat. The 6 people will be chosen at random next week at the club prize giving event, which is being held in the skittle alley of the Langton Court pub (our old venue just round the corner).

 

**** Which brings us to next week (12th June) which is the social evening to be held at the Langton Court Pub, Langton Court Road, St Annes, just around the corner from the school.

 

***** The Western Counties Photographic federation, of which the club is a member, latest news letter is now available from here.

 

****** And the last two PAGB news Letters can be accessed via the following links:

http://www.pagbnews.co.uk/e-news/archive%202014/en115100514_APM_McColl.pdf

http://www.pagbnews.co.uk/e-news/archive%202014/en116010614(3)_MFIAPetc_Lambth_ecAppts_Allbrgt.pdf

 

******* If you fancy having a go at writing for the blog (it doesn’t have to be limited to one person) then have a chat with Mark Stone.

 

All the best

 

Ian G.