12th June 2014. f8 and be there.

A decent turnout at the Langton Court Hotel for the annual social and awards event. The skittle alley thundered to the sounds of skittles standing resolutely in place. For a camera club there were remarkably few in evidence, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing, less clutter to fall over and I don’t want to think of the consequences of joining consumer electronics with liquid (says he typing this with a cup of tea in one hand).  Next year’s calendar was distributed, and I must say that it looked really interesting, and awards were bestowed thus:

Reflex Camera Club Overall Competition results for 2013 – 2014

 

Novice trophy
1st Place 82 Points John Pike
2nd place 43 Points Pauline Ewins
3rd Place 26 Points Wendy Goodchild
Projected Trophy
1st Place 43 Points Pauline Ewins
2nd place 30 Points Mark O’Grady
3rd Place 26 points Wendy Goodchild

&  Angie Wallace

Print Trophy
1st Place 64 Points John Pike
2nd place 55 Points Mark O’Grady
3rd Place 35 Points Alison Davies
John Hankin Shield

(Best Print of the Year)

Eddie House
Stan Scantlebury Shield

(Best Projected of the Year)

Eddie Deponeo
Photographer of the Year

(Overall Points Winner)

85 Points Mark O’Grady

Thanks Julie for the table.

And the winner of the game of Killer in the Skittle Alley was —– Julie Coombs.

 

We have had a successful year in the number and variety of events, speakers and activities and a big club thank you to everyone who made that possible.  The new website looks excellent and new members are joining. With the move to new premises everything seems set fair.

 

To a point we participate in the club in order to determine what makes a good photograph, so that we can go and take good/better photographs.  Practice based learning. There are as many opinions on the “Good”  as there are photographers. One of the reasons that there are competitions and judges is the idea of some sort of standard around the rules of composition, the exposure triangle and leave room for the imagination of the photographer. This year – and it is not very different year to year, nor I fancy, from club to club – we have had many different examples, from different sources. We have had competitions – the best source for individuals for what is known as reflective practice – speakers and practical evenings.  We have had the benefit of the WCPF travelling show. These have also allowed us to look at wider issues too: planning, doing and reviewing, taking the opportunity, making the opportunity. We have also had the chance to talk about the giving of constructive feedback with one of our speakers and to practice it (and don’t I drone on about it every competition round?).

 

So, what have we learned this year? The point is the picture not the gear, Canon, Leica, Nikon, Pentax, Sigma, Sony anything else, not whether it’s a RAW or a JPEG or a TIFF (note that argument, not so very long ago was about whether it was film or digital, an argument that has just gone away) or any other format that counts. If there isn’t a basic structure to grab the attention then all of the above is irrelevant. It doesn’t matter about what it is you are taking a photograph of , it is how it is represented in the frame, what is included and, frequently as important, excluded that makes it so. Vary the angles, up, down, left, right (it’s not about your comfort it’s about the shot!). Keep the viewers eye engaged in the frame – this is why a vignette sometimes helps by keeping the eye from wandering to the outside of the frame on their way out of the picture. It should tell a story, a good one, with a punch-line. That the lighting is everything.

So, looking forward to next season? “F8 and be there”. See you next week.